Drain Old Fuel Out of Your Lawn Mower

While the easiest way to drain the tank is to just open the throttle wide open and let the engine run until it's out of gas, often though, people simply forget this last step, and that's where the trouble begins. Petrol that's been in the mower for more than a couple of months can “go bad," with sediment, varnish-like contaminants, and condensation that can make it difficult to even start the mower again when the time comes. If you find yourself in this situation, here are some steps that you can take to get the old gas out of your lawn mower.

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If you’ve read any of our other articles on lawn mower maintenance we always recommend to drain old fuel out of your lawn mower at the end of the mowing season. An alternative is to keep an eye on the fuel level while mowing so that you run out of gas without needing to drain it, or let it idle and burn off the extra – this is not the best idea for environmental emissions, but accomplishes the drain the tank goal.

Petrol that’s been in the mower for more than a couple of months can “go bad,” with sediment, varnish-like contaminants, and condensation that can make it difficult to even start the mower again when the time comes. If you find yourself in this situation, here are some steps that you can take to get the old gas out of your lawn mower.

ESTIMATED TIME:

30  minutes


How to Get Old Gas Out of a Lawn Mower:

  1. Lay a tarp down or put a large piece of cardboard underneath the mower. It’s best to do this outside, where you will have good ventilation. Make sure you take safety precautions, it is best to use safety glasses and disposable gloves, and have some cat litter handy to quickly absorb any spills.
  2. Remove the gas cap and use a shop towels to wipe down the inside of the filler, removing any grime or debris.
  3. Run the siphon hose from the fuel tank to a gas can on the ground and repeatedly squeeze the bulb until you to create enough of a vacuum for the gas to start draining from the fuel tank to the can.
  4. Drain as much as you can from the tank using the siphon hose.
  5. Next, look over at the carburetor and see if it has a drainage bolt on the bottom of the float tank.
  6. If possible, remove this drainage bolt and let the fuel run out of the float tank. If not, it is best then to unbolt and remove the entire carburetor, and dump out any residue in the tank.
  7. Spray the bore, choke, and any other accessible parts of the carburetor with aerosol carburetor cleaner and then reinstall it on the engine.
  8. Reassemble all of these parts and then start the engine. You may need to spray starting fluid in the carburetor’s bore to get it running again. If all is well, you should be ready to run again for another full season of mowing and yard work.

 

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